• hellenismo:

Panathenaic amphora: Athletic victor receiving prize.  (450-400 BC, from Apulia; now in the Penn Museum…)

    hellenismo:

    Panathenaic amphora: Athletic victor receiving prize.
    (450-400 BC, from Apulia; now in the Penn Museum…)

  • 12 seconds ago
  • interretialia:

    latin-student-problems:

    Your twice-daily reminder to check out these awesome shirts right here! Shipped to your doorstep (probably)!

    Buy one for your mother!

    Bene!

  • 9 minutes ago
  • necspenecmetu:

Joseph Paelinck, Apollo Punishes Midas by Condemning Him to Sport an Ass’s Ear, 1825

    necspenecmetu:

    Joseph Paelinck, Apollo Punishes Midas by Condemning Him to Sport an Ass’s Ear, 1825

  • 19 minutes ago
  • hosvegliato:

I know how to throw a party

    hosvegliato:

    I know how to throw a party

    (via fuckyeahaltars)

  • 26 minutes ago
  • 100artistsbook:

Narcissus. 1926. Franz Von Stuck. German 1863-1928. oil/canvas.
More male art at www.TheArtOfMan.net and www.VitruvianLens.com

    100artistsbook:

    Narcissus. 1926. Franz Von Stuck. German 1863-1928. oil/canvas.

    More male art at www.TheArtOfMan.net and www.VitruvianLens.com

    (Source: hadrian6, via mythologer)

  • 1 hour ago
  • azryal00:

#sdcc2014, #vikingssdcc

    azryal00:

    #sdcc2014, #vikingssdcc

  • 1 hour ago
  • asylum-art:

    Spectacular Genetic Anomaly Results in Butterflies with Male and Female Wings

    Bilateral gynandromorphism in butterflies. The presence of both female (gyn-) and male (andro-) genetic characteristics give rise to an asymmetric half-male-half-female phenotype

    (via oakbrothers)

  • 2 hours ago
  • hellenismo:

Greetings, Lovers of Eleusis!! Today, according to the traditional calendar, it is the first day of the Panathenaia! So, appropriate quotes for the occasion… “It is said that Erichthonius, the foster child of the Goddess (Athena). was the first man to yoke a chariot of horses. Again that Bellerophon received the bridle for his horse from Athena. Triptolemus was younger than Erichthonius. His seed has come from Demeter, yet his chariot came from Athena, so that all such things must be regarded as the gift of Athena to mankind. ” (excerpt from Aelius Aristides, speech XXXVII, to Athena) “The Festival of the Panathenaia is the good order that descends from the Intellect in the cosmos and the separation that prevents the cosmic opposites from mixing: because Athena is at the same time ‘friend of wisdom and friend of war’.” (Proklos, in Tim. 85, 10) [Athena in the Gigantomachy, fragment. Early 5C BC. Archaeological Museum of Eleusis.]

    hellenismo:

    Greetings, Lovers of Eleusis!!
    Today, according to the traditional calendar, it is the first day of the Panathenaia!
    So, appropriate quotes for the occasion…
    “It is said that Erichthonius, the foster child of the Goddess (Athena). was the first man to yoke a chariot of horses. Again that Bellerophon received the bridle for his horse from Athena. Triptolemus was younger than Erichthonius. His seed has come from Demeter, yet his chariot came from Athena, so that all such things must be regarded as the gift of Athena to mankind. ” (excerpt from Aelius Aristides, speech XXXVII, to Athena)
    “The Festival of the Panathenaia is the good order that descends from the Intellect in the cosmos and the separation that prevents the cosmic opposites from mixing: because Athena is at the same time ‘friend of wisdom and friend of war’.” (Proklos, in Tim. 85, 10)

    [Athena in the Gigantomachy, fragment. Early 5C BC. Archaeological Museum of Eleusis.]

  • 2 hours ago
  • clioancientart:

Hellenistic marble male bust with features similar to Alexander the Great, resembling the god Helios but also perhaps intended to represent a Hellenistic ruler, such as one of the Seleukid or Pergamene kings. Note the  holes just at the hairline for inserting a metal crown or rays. In the Archaeology Museum, City of Rhodes, Island of Rhodes, Greece.
Photo Credit: Clio Ancient Art and Antiquities

    clioancientart:

    Hellenistic marble male bust with features similar to Alexander the Great, resembling the god Helios but also perhaps intended to represent a Hellenistic ruler, such as one of the Seleukid or Pergamene kings. Note the  holes just at the hairline for inserting a metal crown or rays. In the Archaeology Museum, City of Rhodes, Island of Rhodes, Greece.

    Photo Credit: Clio Ancient Art and Antiquities

  • 2 hours ago
    2 hours ago